Press release: Stop Robbing Our Democracy

Press release

Dozens Protest Outside Home of Supreme Court President: Stop Robbing Our Democracy.

Dozens of activists gathered today (Friday) in Israeli flag-bearing cars outside the home of Supreme Court President Esther Hayut to protest what they called the Supreme Court’s gross abuse of power and violation of Israel’s democracy.

The protest, organized by the Zionist watchdog Im Tirtzu, was held in response to the Supreme Court’s decision this week to order now former Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein to convene the Knesset plenum.

According to the protestors, the Supreme Court’s decision was a political move in clear violation of the law and was the latest in a long history of undemocratic and biased political activism by the court.

Earlier this week, a similar convoy of more than 100 cars set out to the Supreme Court in Jerusalem. Given the current health crisis, the organizers of the protest stressed that both protests were coordinated with the police and adhered to the guidelines of the Health Ministry.

Lior Cohen, one of the protestors from Haifa, said:

“We are sick of the judges robbing us of our democracy, and Esther Hayut is the one leading the charge.”

Another protestor, Yael Libowitz from Kiryat Ata, stated:

“Israel’s legislative and executive branches are effectively gone. What’s left is a judicial tyranny headed by the Supreme Court, which makes the laws and carries them out.

Im Tirtzu CEO Matan Peleg, stated:

“The High Court justices have no shame whatsoever. They blatantly violate basic democratic principles of democracy with impunity. The time has come to end this judicial dictatorship.”

……

 

Eytan Meir. Director of External Relations & Development

Im Tirtzu – Building the Zionist Dream

imti.org.il/en

Im Tirtzu is a Zionist non-governmental organization based in Israel.  Its name is derived from an epigraph appended to the frontispiece of Theodor Herzl’s novel Altneuland, ‘if you wish it, it is no fairy-tale,’ rendered into modern Hebrew in Nahum Sokolow’s translation in 1903, as Im tirtzu ein zo agadah.

Check Also

An Israeli View: With the Abraham Accords, The Times They Are A-Changin’

Years ago, a survey was done in Japan, where people were asked how many people …